15:37Tallinn

ALL THREE LINES START FROM VIRU SQUARE (VENUS CLUB). IT IS ALSO END POINT OF ALL THREE LINES.

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Orange Line

The Orange Line is ideal if you want to see how past rulers of Estonia lived. The line starts at Viru Square, which is the starting point for all lines, and takes you up Toompea Hill, where the rulers of Estonia have been based since the beginning of time. On the hill stands Toompea Castle, which is rather young at just 200 years of age. The Estonian parliament or Riigikogu still runs our country from here. You will also see the ancient, 800-year-old castle next to that belonged to the German Order, and its tower, which is called Tall Hermann. The flag flying on the tower tells you who rules Estonia.

After our visit to Toompea we pass the vast Estonian National Library built at the end of the 1980s, Freedom Square with its recently erected Victory monument, the headquarters of the Bank of Estonia where the Republic of Estonia was proclaimed on 24 February 1918, and the Estonian National Opera, which will be celebrating its 100th anniversary this year and is one of the cornerstones of our national culture.

The icing on the cake on this line is picturesque Kadriorg Park, which is the largest park in Tallinn and located close to a luxurious residential area with lovely wooden houses. These homes are a couple of hundreds of years old and used to belong to the noblemen and rich merchants of the Russian Empire. When Peter I established a park in this valley, he dedicated it to his second wife, Catherine. The park's name, Kadriorg or "Katariina's Valley" originates from her name. In addition to the romantic park adorned with beautiful ponds, Peter I also established his summer residence there. He even laid three stones in the building's wall with his own hands.

Today Kadriorg is known for its museums, like the one located in the palace established by Peter I and the Estonian Art Museum ('Kumu'), which is one of the most modern of its kind in Europe.

Kadriorg is a great place to see, so hop off the bus and take a look around. Once you've seen the park, you can continue discovering Tallinn by hopping back on.

When you spend time walking between the high-rise buildings in the city centre, you might find it difficult to believe that Tallinn is one of the greenest capitals in Europe. To prove that, the Orange Line takes us to the green areas of Tallinn like Song Festival Ground, the venue for the national song festivals, which are held once every four years and always bring about a quarter of the country's population to Tallinn – 20,000 singers and an entire hillside full of spectators. In the meantime the grounds are used as a concert venue – world famous artists from Madonna to the Rolling Stones have performed here. Another reason why the Song Festival Ground are loved and revered by Estonians is that the popular movement we know as the Singing Revolution and which led to Estonia regaining its independence started here in the late 1980s.

Driving along the coast the Line then takes you to Maarjamäe, the site of the famous Orlov Castle, which now houses part of the History Museum. You can get off the bus here and enjoy the museum and views over Tallinn Bay, or continue on to the Kloostrimetsa Circuit, which has been the venue of the legendary Kalev races for decades.

The Kloostrimetsa Circuit takes us to Metsakalmistu or the Forest Cemetery, which is a quiet graveyard that looks like a park and a place where many famous people from our country are buried – from writers to scientists and sportsmen to politicians. Right across the road from the cemetery are the Tallinn Botanical Gardens with their rare and exotic plants, which you can admire during a walk through the gardens, as our bus stops right in front of them.

The newly renovated 314-metre TV Tower is the most unique building on the Green Line. It is not only the tallest building in Tallinn, but in the Baltic States. In addition to the other exciting attractions there is a café on the 22nd floor, 190 m above the ground and offering 360-degree views which prove that Tallinn really is a green capital.

On the way back to the city centre we also pass the ancient ruins of Pirita Convent, which has long been a popular dating site for young couples. The mystical atmosphere of the convent also makes it a great venue for classical music concerts and festivals. As we drive through Pirita you will also see the Olympic Centre built for the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games, as the yachting regatta was held here in Tallinn.

Back in the City Centre, the line goes to the D-terminal and A-terminal( known as cruise ship terminal), and then the bus goes to the Kalamaja district, known for its stylish wooden houses and bohemian charm. There you can visit one of the most beautiful Maritime Museum of Northern Europe.